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Several introductory and tutorial articles on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) are referenced in the shorter XML Introduction document. "The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is the universal format for structured documents and data on the Web." -- W3C XML Web site, 2000-07-06.

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is descriptively identified in the XML 1.0 W3C Recommendation as "an extremely simple dialect [or 'subset'] of SGML" the goal of which "is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML," for which reason "XML has been designed for ease of implementation, and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML." Note that the "HTML" referenced in the preceding sentence (bis) means HTML 4.0 and 3.2 which were in common use as of 10-February-1998, when the XML 1.0 specification was published as a W3C Recommendation.

These working groups were designed to have close liaison relationships with the W3C's Extensible Style[sheet] Language (XSL) Working Group and Document Object Model (DOM) Working Group.

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The W3C XML WG has published a technical NOTE providing a "detailed comparison of the additional restrictions that XML places on documents beyond those of SGML": see for the details. (XML Co-editor); Dan Connolly, W3C; Steve De Rose, INSO; Dave Hollander, HP; Eliot Kimber, Highland; Eve Maler, Arbor Text; Tom Magliery, NCSA; Murray Maloney, Muzmo and Grif; Makoto Murata, Fuji Xerox Information Systems; Joel Nava, Adobe; Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad; John Tigue, Data Channel." Historically: The W3C SGML Editorial Review Board, as of November 5, 1996, had the following members: Jon Bosak, Sun ([email protected]), chair; Tim Bray, Textuality ([email protected]), editor; James Clark ([email protected]), technical lead; Dan Connolly ([email protected]), W3C contact; Steve De Rose, EBT ([email protected]), editor; Dave Hollander, HP ([email protected]); Eliot Kimber, Passage Systems ([email protected]); Tom Magliery, NCSA ([email protected]); Eve Maler, Arbor Text ([email protected]); Jean Paoli, Microsoft ([email protected]); Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad ([email protected]); C. These specifications are being developed by various working groups, sometimes as part of activity outside the sphere of the XML Activity. Some already play a vital role in profitable commercial enterprise.

It is also expected to find use in certain metadata applications.

XML is fully internationalized for both European and Asian languages, with all conforming processors required to support the Unicode character set in both its UTF-8 and UTF-16 encodings. Abstract: "The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a subset of SGML that is completely described in this document.

In addition, Web Collections can be expressed inside HTML documents or on their own. Some of the anticipated applications of Web Collections include Web Maps, HTML Email Threading, PIM functions, scheduling, content labeling, and distributed authoring." ["work in progress"] Netscape Communications announced a new proposed XML application.

In addition they are stylistically similar to HTML to enable easy authoring. According to the notice on the Netscape Developer's page: "The Meta Content Framework, or MCF, provides a standard way to describe files or collections of information. According to the introduction, XML-Data "describes an XML vocabulary for schemas, that is, for defining and documenting object classes.

Markup encodes a description of the document's storage layout and logical structure. See now the separate document for references to SGML/XML FAQs.